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‘Étant donnés’: Questioning the material and marginal givens of modernisms scholarship

(A Meta-Modernist Symposium)

12-13 April 2013
University College Cork

Plenary Speakers:
Dr Sara Crangle, University of Sussex
Dr Ruth Hemus, Royal Holloway

This is an invitation to interrogate how we think and do modernisms scholarship. It is a call to examine assumptions about the materiality and marginality of modernisms and an appeal to evaluate how criticism responds to the format of formalism.

The aim of ‘Étant donnés’ is to provoke a critical (re)evaluation of the lines we draw around and between modernist practices. Embracing a chronologically broad conceptualization of literary, plastic and performative ‘modernisms’, it seeks to generate self-reflexive scholarly investigations across disciplines.

We welcome proposals for papers from students and scholars of modernism(s) across the humanities, as well as from editors, archivists, translators, publishers and curators of modernist cultural artefacts. Proposals for challenges to the critical consensus on topics material or marginal will be especially well received, as will proposals to treat the potential impact of new technologies and reports of explorations from virgin and fallow territories within (or around) the field.

Abstracts of 300 words can be sumitted to modernismsucc@gmail.com by January 30, 2012.

Generously supported by the Irish Research Council ‘New Foundations’ Scheme.

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CFPs Events Postgraduate

CFP *deadline Dec 7* The British Society for Literature and Science Conference 2013

British Society for Literature and Science Conference 2013 – Call for Papers

**deadline Friday 7 December 2012**

 

Cardiff University and the University of Glamorgan

The British Society for Literature and Science invites proposals for papers and panels to be delivered at its eighth annual conference to be held in Cardiff, 11-13 April 2013.

The BSLS Conference does not have a theme (as it its usual practise) but especially welcomes proposals on the state of the field of literature and science as well as its relation to other fields. This year we would be particularly interested to receive proposals that reflect upon the interdisciplinary study of literature and science in the context of the debate about the present position of the humanities in academia. However, the Society remains committed to supporting proposals on all aspects of literature and science across all periods.

Proposals for papers of 15-20 minutes should be sent in the body of the email text (no attachments, please), to bsls2013@yahoo.co.uk with the subject line ‘BSLS 2013 abstract’. Submissions should include the title of the paper, an abstract of no more than 300 words, a maximum of 3 keywords (placed at the end of the abstract), and the name and contact details of the speaker.

Closing date for submissions: 7 December 2012.

(Decisions will be made in January 2013)

Contributors interested in organising a panel or other special session, or who have suggestions for alternative forms of conference presentation, are warmly encouraged to contact the conference organisers. The organisers would welcome, for example, workshops on teaching literature and science, or on specific themes in literature and science that cross period boundaries, or on specific published works with considerable influence in the field. Please email the organisers on bsls2013@yahoo.co.uk, using ‘BSLS 2013 Panel’ as the subject line in email correspondence.

 

Funding: a bursary of £150 will be awarded to a graduate student on the basis on the paper proposals. The student must be registered for a masters or doctoral degree on 9 January 2013. The conference fee will be waived for two further graduate students in exchange for written reports on the conference, to be published in the subsequent issue of the BSLS Newsletter. If you are interested in being selected for one of these places, please mention this when sending in your proposal.

 

Accommodation: please note that those attending will need to make their own arrangements for accommodation. Information on selected hotels will be available shortly on the conference website.As in previous years, we anticipate that the conference will begin at about 1pm on the first day and conclude at about 2pm on the last.

 

Membership: in order to attend the conference, you must be a paid-up member of the BSLS for 2013. We anticipate that it will be possible to pay the £10 annual membership fee when paying the conference fee online.

 

FURTHER INFORMATION

Visit the conference website at: http://literatureandscience.research.glam.ac.uk/bsls2013/

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CFPs Events Postgraduate

CFP: Modernist Intimacies, 17 May 2013, University of Sussex

Call for Papers:

 

Modernist Intimacies

 

Friday May 17, 2013.

 

Centre for Modernist Studies

University of Sussex

 

Responding to recent scholarly constellations of modernism, affect and intimacy this one-day symposium, hosted by the Centre for Modernist Studies at University of Sussex, seeks to explore new ways of thinking about modernist feeling and modernist intimacies. Are there such things as “modernist feelings”? How might different modernist narratives of emotion in psychoanalysis, literary theory, philosophy and medicine be made to collide, disrupt and form new points of contact? How do modernist bodies come together and apart?

 

We encourage papers from academics at all stages in their career and hope to encourage inter-generational discussions.

 

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

 

-Genealogies of modernist affect

-Narratives of (im)personality

-Modernist diaries, autobiographies and letters

– Scenes of intimacy and extimacy in modernist writing

-The role of affect in modernist cinema and/or other visual arts

-Touch, texture, and textuality

-Modernist emotional geographies

-Modernism and affective disorders

-Modernist archives of feeling

– Constructions of publicity and privacy in modernist writing

 

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words (for 15-20 minute papers) and a short biography to Ruth Charnock at:  rnec20@sussex.ac.uk by 15th January, 2013.

 

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CFPs Events

CFP 1 Dec: ‘”Efface the Traces!” Modernism and Influence’

The deadline for submission of abstracts for this conference has been extended to 1 January 2013.

Please see below for the call for papers.

Conference: ‘”Efface the Traces!” Modernism and Influence’

Durham University, 9-11 April 2013

Keynote Speakers:

Dr Matthew Bevis (University of Oxford)

Dr Marina MacKay (Durham University)

Dr Ankhi Mukherjee (University of Oxford)

‘[T]he poets of the nineties were entirely missed out of my personal history […] I never read any of these people until it was much too late for me to get anything out of them’. T.S. Eliot, letter to Ezra Pound, 1924 ‘[I]t was towards the end of my school days or in my first year or two at Harvard University [that] I was reading the poets of the ‘nineties, who were the only poets […] who at that period of history seemed to have anything to offer me as a beginner’.

T.S. Eliot, Saltire Review, iv, 1957

If Ezra Pound’s clamorous injunction – ‘make it new!’ – might be considered the first commandment of modernism, then Brecht’s dictum – ‘efface the traces!’ – stands as its complementary shadow statement. As the example of Eliot begins to illustrate, the Poundian urge to transfigure ‘legitimate’ influences results in a comparable urge to efface influences considered inappropriate. However, criticism has often proved inadequately alert to the motives underlying authorial advertisement and evasion of influence, instead colluding with the artist in the construction of a suspiciously orderly canonical narrative of modernist influence. We dutifully discuss Eliot as the heir of Dante and Donne; we corroborate Woolf’s departure from Wells and Bennett; we identify the Ibsen in Exiles, and the Confucianism of the Cantos. This conference is conceived in the belief that the intersection between advertised and effaced influence operates as a particularly illuminating point of departure from which to develop new critical perspectives on the narrative(s) of modernism. This approach is also efficacious in projecting enquiry beyond the conventional spatial and temporal locus of modernism (London/Paris, 1890-1930), by drawing attention to hidden nineteenth-century proto-modernisms, and the contemporaneous cross-cultural interaction of rivalling counter-modernisms. Similarly, it encourages a nuanced handling of the vicissitudes of the mid-to-late twentieth-century reception of modernism – from Larkin’s early jettisoning of Yeats to Winterson’s strident advocacy of Woolf – by drawing attention both to the cultural investments of the modernist authors themselves, and to those of subsequent writers striving to stake out a distinct position beyond modernism’s daunting shadow.

We invite 20 minute papers and panel proposals on any of the following variations upon this theme, although respondents should not consider themselves restricted to these topics. Interdisciplinary research is also very much welcomed.

Negotiating anxieties of influence

Modernist self-fashioning

The response of present-day writers to modernism

Influence across disciplines

Effacement strategies

The figuring of modernism as either a positive or negative aesthetic precursor

Influence as a factor in constructing aesthetic communities

The marketing of influence

Originality in an age of mechanical reproduction

The traffic of influence between medical discourses and modernist texts

Feminist celebration of influence

Other modernism(s): influence across cultural borders

Authorial progression and amendment of influence

The mediation of influence through parody and allusion

Defining disciplines: influence within academic theory after modernism

The politics of literary parentage

Friendship networks, publicity conspiracies, and group-think

Nineteenth-century post-Romantic culture and modernism

Abstracts of no more than 250 words are invited by 1st January 2013. Please email submissions to effacethetraces@gmail.com. You can also use this address to contact us with any other questions, such as how to arrange attendance as a non-speaking delegate. Additionally, you can visit our website at effacethetraces.wordpress.com. The conference will take place in St. Chad’s College, Durham. Panels will follow the format of three 20-minute papers followed by questions, and each day will feature a plenary speaker.

The registration fee is £30 for salaried academics and £15 for postgraduates and postdoctoral researchers. We will be offering three postgraduate bursaries to particularly outstanding applicants, to cover the registration fee, accommodation, and a portion of travel costs. If you are the recipient of a bursary, we will inform you when accepting your paper.

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CFPs

Religion, Philosophy and Myth in T.S. Eliot’s Poetry

Call for Papers

 

Plenary Speaker: Professor Valentine Cunningham

(Author of British Writers of the Thirties & Reading After Theory)

Seminar Leader: Dr Jane Dowson

(Author of Women, Modernism and British Poetry, 1910-1939: Resisting Femininity)

 

Colloquium at University of Leicester, 6th September 2013

 

This colloquium responds to the burgeoning critical interest in the religious and spiritual themes within literary modernism. As Barry Spurr argues in Anglo-Catholic in Religion: T.S. Eliot and Christianity (2010), there is yet much scope for reconsidering Eliot’s poetry vis-à-vis his religious position. Eliot’s modernist poetics are inseparable from his spiritual sensibility, and his Anglo-Catholic belief was shaped by other discursive influences such as anthropology and philosophy. Furthermore, Eliot’s spiritual development was not a logical matter and his devotional poetry is rarely didactic or transparent. This colloquium seeks to pay particular attention to the religious nuances of Eliot’s poetic development.

 

As a colloquium, the day will consist of discussion of papers which are submitted in full and circulated to all participants in advance. We welcome papers that consider the religious/spiritual implications of T.S. Eliot’s poetry. Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to, the following:

 

  • Anglo-Catholic belief
  • Prufrock, a meaningless life and the quest for spiritual fulfilment
  • Traditions of religious poetry
  • Mythography/New Criticism and restoring the waste land
  • The use of biblical metaphor
  • Ariel Poems and revelation
  • Modernist poetics and expressions of faith in a post-religious context
  • Ash-Wednesday, faith and lack of faith
  • Biblical prophets of doom or salvation
  • Four Quartets and the movement of time

 

Please send proposals of 250-300 words to Dr Scott Freer sef17@le.ac.uk (author of Modernist Mythopoeia: The Twilight of the Gods, Palgrave 2013), by 31st March 2013. Delegates must submit completed papers (approx. 4,000 words) by 20th July 2013. Publishers will be approached with a proposal for a collection of essays based on the colloquium.

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CFPs Events Postgraduate

Religion, Philosophy and Myth in T.S. Eliot’s Poetry Colloquium CFP deadline March 2013

 

Religion, Philosophy and Myth in T.S. Eliot’s Poetry

 

Call for Papers

 

Plenary Speaker: Professor Valentine Cunningham

(Author of British Writers of the Thirties Reading After Theory)

Seminar Leader: Dr Jane Dowson

(Author of Women, Modernism and British Poetry, 1910-1939: Resisting Femininity)

 

Colloquium at University of Leicester, 6th September 2013

 

This colloquium responds to the burgeoning critical interest in the religious and spiritual themes within literary modernismAs Barry Spurr argues in Anglo-Catholic in Religion: T.S. Eliot and Christianity (2010), there is yet much scope for reconsidering Eliot’s poetry vis-à-vis his religious position. Eliot’s modernist poetics are inseparable from his spiritual sensibility, and his Anglo-Catholic belief was shaped by other discursiveinfluences such as anthropology and philosophy. Furthermore, Eliot’s spiritual development was not a logicalmatter and his devotional poetry is rarely didactic or transparent. This colloquium seeks to pay particular attention to the religious nuances of Eliot’s poetic development.

 

As a colloquium, the day will consist of discussion of papers which are submitted in full and circulated to all participants in advance. We welcome papers that consider the religious/spiritual implications of T.S. Eliot’s poetry. Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to, the following:

 

Anglo-Catholic belief

Prufrock, a meaningless life and the quest for spiritual fulfilment

Traditions of religious poetry

Mythography/New Criticism and restoring the waste land

The use of biblical metaphor

Ariel Poems and revelation

Modernist poetics and expressions of faith in a post-religious context

Ash-Wednesday, faith and lack of faith

Biblical prophets of doom or salvation

Four Quartets and the movement of time

 

Please send proposals of 250-300 words to Dr Scott Freer sef17@le.ac.uk (author of Modernist Mythopoeia:The Twilight of the GodsPalgrave 2013), by 31st March 2013. Delegates must submit completed papers(approx. 4,000 words) by 20th July 2013. Publishers will be approached with a proposal for a collection of essays based on the colloquium.

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CFPs Events

‘Efface the Traces!’ – Modernism and Influence Durham University, 9-11 April 2013 CFP

‘Efface the Traces!’ – Modernism and Influence

Durham University, 9-11 April 2013

 

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS EXTENDED TO 1 JANUARY 2013

 

‘[T]he poets of the nineties were entirely missed out of my personal history […] I never read any of these people until it was much too late for me to get anything out of them’.

T.S. Eliot, letter to Ezra Pound, 1924

‘[I]t was towards the end of my school days or in my first year or two at Harvard University [that] I was reading the poets of the ‘nineties, who were the only poets […] who at that period of history seemed to have anything to offer me as a beginner’.

T.S. Eliot, Saltire Review, iv, 1957

 

If Ezra Pound’s clamorous injunction – ‘make it new!’ – might be considered the first commandment of modernism, then Brecht’s dictum – ‘efface the traces!’ – stands as its complementary shadow statement. As the example of Eliot begins to illustrate, the Poundian urge to transfigure ‘legitimate’ influences results in a comparable urge to efface influences considered inappropriate. However, criticism has often proved inadequately alert to the motives underlying authorial advertisement and evasion of influence, instead colluding with the artist in the construction of a suspiciously orderly canonical narrative of modernist influence. We dutifully discuss Eliot as the heir of Dante and Donne; we corroborate Woolf’s departure from Wells and Bennett; we identify the Ibsen in Exiles, and the Confucianism of the Cantos.

This conference is conceived in the belief that the intersection between advertised and effaced influence operates as a particularly illuminating point of departure from which to develop new critical perspectives on the narrative(s) of modernism. This approach is also efficacious in projecting enquiry beyond the conventional spatial and temporal locus of modernism (London/Paris, 1890-1930), by drawing attention to hidden nineteenth-century proto-modernisms, and the contemporaneous cross-cultural interaction of rivalling counter-modernisms. Similarly, it encourages a nuanced handling of the vicissitudes of the mid-to-late twentieth-century reception of modernism – from Larkin’s early jettisoning of Yeats to Winterson’s strident advocacy of Woolf – by drawing attention both to the cultural investments of the modernist authors themselves, and to those of subsequent writers striving to stake out a distinct position beyond modernism’s daunting shadow.

We invite 20 minute papers on any of the following variations upon this theme, although respondents should not consider themselves restricted to these topics. Interdisciplinary research is also very much welcomed.

  • Negotiating anxieties of influence
  • Modernist self-fashioning
  • The response of present-day writers to modernism
  • Influence across disciplines
  • Effacement strategies
  • The figuring of modernism as either a positive or negative aesthetic precursor
  • Influence as a factor in constructing aesthetic communities
  • The marketing of influence
  • Originality in an age of mechanical reproduction
  • The traffic of influence between medical discourses and modernist texts
  • Feminist celebration of influence
  • Other modernism(s): influence across cultural borders
  • Authorial progression and amendment of influence
  • The mediation of influence through parody and allusion
  • Defining disciplines: influence within academic theory after modernism
  • The politics of literary parentage
  • Friendship networks, publicity conspiracies, and group-think
  • Nineteenth-century post-Romantic culture and modernism

Abstracts of no more than 250 words are invited by 1st January 2013. Please email submissions to effacethetraces@gmail.com. You can also use this address to contact us with any additional questions, such as how to arrange attendance as a non-speaking delegate. Additionally, you can visit our website at effacethetraces.wordpress.com.

The conference will take place in St. Chad’s College, Durham. Panels will follow the format of three 20-minute papers followed by questions, and each day will feature a plenary speaker. Our plenary speakers will be Dr Matthew Bevis (University of Oxford), Dr Marina MacKay (Durham University), and Professor Pat Waugh (Durham University). The registration fee is £30 for salaried academics and £15 for postgraduates and postdoctoral researchers. We will be offering three postgraduate bursaries to particularly outstanding applicants, to cover the registration fee, accommodation, and a portion of travel costs. If you are the recipient of a bursary, we will inform you when accepting your paper.