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Events

Anglo-Russian Research Network, 15 February

The next Anglo-Russian Research Network reading group will be examining the work of British Travel Writer Stephen Graham, and his work on Russia in particular. Michael Hughes, Professor of Russian and International History at the University of Liverpool, will be introducing some texts by Graham and leading the discussion, which will take place at Pushkin House, London, on Friday 15th February from 5-7pm. If you are interested in attending please contact Matthew Taunton or Rebecca Beasley and we will supply you with pdfs of the reading materials.

http://bit.ly/WV1Ygc

Categories
CFPs Events Postgraduate

Problems with Authority: the International Flann O’Brien Conference, CFP 1 Feb 2013

Problems with Authority:
The II International Flann O’Brien Conference
Rome, June 19-21, 2013

KEYNOTES

Jed Esty
(University of Pennsylvania)

Carol Taaffe
(Author of Ireland Through the Looking-Glass: Flann O’Brien, Myles na gCopaleen & Irish Cultural Debate)

Dirk Van Hulle
(University of Antwerp)

The International Flann O’Brien Society is proud to announce that a conference
on the Works of Brian O’Nolan will be hosted by the Department of
Comparative Literatures, at the Università Roma Tre under the title ‘Problems
with Authority: The II International Flann O’Brien Conference’.
It is an exciting time for the expanding field of Brian O’Nolan scholarship.
Despite the significant increase in O’Nolan events and publications since his
centenary year in 2011 – and even, perhaps, because of them – a great deal of
work remains to be done in exploring O’Nolan’s under-analysed minor texts
and in closing the many critical gaps in the academic record. At the centre of
these critical projects are explorations of O’Nolan’s texts as fertile territory for
mediating between conflicting Authorities: between traditional and modern
scripts, local and international perspectives, and between avant-garde and
conservative approaches to the authorities of science, history, and literary
tradition. With these issues in mind, the conference aims to address questions of
canonicity and authority in Brian O’Nolan’s work.
2013 sees the publication of collections of O’Nolan’s short stories (Neil Murphy
& Keith Hopper, Dalkey Archive) and dramatic works (Daniel Jernigan, Dalkey
Archive). As these collections give us greater access to a rich variety of
overlooked texts in the O’Nolan literary canon, they also prompt and challenge
us to broaden and retrace its borders. Indeed, given the amount of pseudonyms
and apocryphal texts in play, we might ask whether these borders can ever be
definitively drawn. Similarly, the vast collections of O’Nolan’s correspondence,
manuscripts, and drafts housed in Illinois, Boston, and Texas, – as well as The
Irish Times’s online digital archive – have recently given rise to emerging fields of
Genetic and Cultural Materialist approaches that seek to explore the borders of
authorship and authority in O’Nolan’s ever-expanding oeuvre.
And while longer-running critical conversations continue to be finessed about
the ways in which O’Nolan’s texts are shaped by towering 20th Century figures
such as Joyce and Beckett (and the more local authorities of Church and State),
the increasingly international contexts in which O’Nolan is being read have
brought a new set of names to the table: from Calvino, Borges, and Kafka, to
Nabokov, Danielewski and Bolaño. This international gaze brings with it other
issues, such as the challenges of adaptation and translation, and the
opportunities of exploring O’Nolan’s broader canon as a fertile ground for a
range of critical perspectives, from Cultural Materialism, Queer Theory, and
Feminism, to Metafiction, Genre Theory, and Deconstruction.
As well as keynote lectures by eminent scholars Jed Esty, Carol Taaffe, & Dirk
Van Hulle, the programme will include performances by Mark O’Halloran
(Award-winning screenwriter of Adam and Paul and Garage), and Mikel Murfi
(Director of John Duffy’s Brother). For more details as they emerge, including
social programmes and accommodation and travel details visit our website:
http://www.univie.ac.at/flannobrien2011/IFOBS.html
The organisers invite proposals on any aspect of O’Nolan’s writing, but are
especially interested in papers that explore questions of authorship and authority
in O’Nolan’s work, including, but not limited to:
Broadening the Canon
– Problems of canonicity and the reception of minor works
– O’Nolan on Screen and Stage: The forgotten scripts
– O’Nolan as letter writer
– Challenges in adapting/translating O’Nolan’s writing
On Whose Authority?
– Ideological critique & the comedic subversion of authority in O’Nolan’s
writing
– Conflicting Authorities: The traditional vs. the avant-garde, the local vs.
the international in O’Nolan’s writing
– Writing Under the Influence: O’Nolan & his contemporaries
– The Clowning of Science: Menippean Satire and the encyclopaedic ideal
Theoretical Authorities
– Death of the Author: O’Nolan and Capital “T” Theory
– O’Nolan and theories of Genre
– Cultural Materialist and Genetic Approaches
– Male Authorities / Feminist Readings
– The Reception of Flann O’Brien in Ireland and beyond
Please submit abstracts and panel proposals to viennacis.anglistik@univie.ac.at by February 1st 2013.

John McCourt (Università Roma Tre)
Ruben Borg (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Paul Fagan (University of Vienna)

Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/events/481105721922267/?ref=ts&fref=ts

Categories
CFPs Events Postgraduate

Maverick Voices and Modernity, CFP 1 March 2013

‘We Speak a Different Tongue’: Maverick Voices and Modernity, 1890-1939

Website: http://www.dur.ac.uk/maverick.voices/

St John’s College, Durham University

“Maverick Voices and Modernity” is an international conference whose aim is to explore and reflect upon the wide range of writers that were caught up in the Modernist moment, but traditionally fall outside of what has been thought of as literary Modernism. Our event registers those individual voices that offer alternative visions and counter-responses to mainstream Modernism and often still remain in productive dialogue and tension with key aspects of established Modernism.

Deadline for abstracts: 1st March 2013.

Plenary speakers: Professor Chris Baldick (Goldsmiths College, University of London) and Professor Michael O’Neill (Durham University).

Call for Papers

With a focus on the fiction, poetry, and drama of the period 1890-1939, “Maverick Voices” registers the diversity of innovation beyond the traditionally defined boundaries of literary Modernism. Famously in “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” (1924), Virginia Woolf distinguishes between two literary camps: the Edwardians and the Georgians. By praising the Georgians and vilifying the Edwardians, Woolf privileges an aesthetic of what later became identified as Modernism against a continuing tradition of realism. This is indicative of both continuities and discontinuities – between Modernism and, in Yeats’s phrase, those different tongues of nineteenth-century sensibilities – which have prevailed as a persistent presence in much recent literary criticism.

“Maverick Voices” contributes to current debates about where the boundaries of literary Modernism should be drawn. In so doing, our conference explores the alternative visions of those individuals who hover at the fringes of cosmopolitan artistic milieus. Relevant questions that could be explored in relation to these marginal voices are: Does a privileging of Modernism undervalue texts that are perceived to operate outside either the parameters of its understood aesthetic and/or periodization? Are there marginalised or obscure texts whose avant-garde experiments renew a sense of the plurality of types of modernisms? Can the ascription of a proto-Modernist tag expand understandings of how texts respond in distinct ways to the pressures of modernity? Indeed, do some literary texts in their own inventive ways produce an alternative poetics to the widely recognized canon of such authors as Woolf and Pound? To what extent do these texts disrupt or engage in dialogue with critical narratives of Modernism?

By addressing these questions in relation to those responses and counter-responses to literary Modernism our conference aims at highlighting those alternative visions of contemporaneous maverick individuals. It further hopes to challenge strict periodization and suggest new points of inception. Authors of relevance to these vital questions might include, but are not limited to: Ford Madox Ford, D. H. Lawrence, George Egerton, W. B. Yeats, Katharine Burdekin, Arthur Machen, Rebecca West, Evelyn Waugh, Noël Coward, Charlotte Mew, George Bernard Shaw, John Galsworthy, Ella Hepworth Dixon, George Moore, Aldous Huxley, Walter de la Mare, James Elroy Flecker, A. E. Housman, G. K. Chesterton, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, Thomas Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Arnold Bennett.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

.           Responses to labels and manifestoes
.           Counter-experiments
.           Individual counter-subjectivities
.           Canonicity and marginality
.           Individuals, groups, and cosmopolitanism
.           Late Victorianism and modernity
.           Poetics of the fin-de-siècle and beyond
.           Continental interludes in Anglo-American modernity
.           Avant-garde and Decadence
.           Science fiction
.           Gothic revivals
.           Innovations in popular fiction
.           New Woman discourse
.           Experimentalism in Fantasy/Romance
.           Experimental Realisms
.           Mysticism/esoteric forms of modernity
.           Pornography/censorship
.           Georgian poetry
.           Writers on the periphery of Modernism
.           Utopian/Dystopian narratives

Proposals for twenty-minute papers on any aspect of maverick voices and modernity should be submitted as email attachments by Friday, 1st March 2013 to maverick.voices@durham.ac.uk

Abstracts should be between 200-250 words. Please attach a one-page CV and state name, affiliation, and contact details in the body of the email. For queries please contact co-organisers by email.

Categories
CFPs Events Postgraduate

‘Shifting Territories’: Modern & Contemporary Poetics of Place CFP 4 March 2013

SHIFTING TERRITORIES
MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY POETICS OF PLACE

Call for Papers – Deadline for abstracts 4 March, 2013

Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher conference organised by Oxford Brookes University
22nd and 23rd May, 2013 at Institute of English Studies, London, UK

CFP2

‘Shifting Territories’ will consider the recent wave of new nature writing and poetry which goes beyond traditional representations of landscape to venture into borderlands, edgelands and urban environments: a development which has been addressed in texts like Granta 102: The New Nature Writing (Summer, 2008), Tim Dee’s ‘Nature Writing’ essay in Archipelago 5 (Winter, 2010-11) and Poetry Review 102: The Poetry of Place (Spring, 2012). The conference aims to determine if this current poetic and critical interest in poetry of place is a direct response to environmental crises or whether it is merely a refashioning of what poetry has always taken as its subject. By creating a space for dialogue about modern and contemporary poets’ use of place, we seek to address the development of this subject in the 20th and 21st centuries. The conference will examine the ways in which poets use language to negotiate the relentlessly shifting concepts of identity and place and how particular locations, or states of flux, have shaped their aesthetic.

Topics for papers might include, but are not limited to:

Poetry derived from a locality / region
Belonging versus rootlessness
Challenging sentimentality, nostalgia and pastoral idylls
Uncertainty and unfixity in place and language
Outsiders and occupiers of non-place
Built environments and urban landscapes
Ecocritical approaches to place
Contested territories / postcolonial perspectives on landscape
Dialogues and distinctions between modern and contemporary poets’ use of place

The conference will feature poetry readings and will also include a postgraduate and ECR training workshop on publishing research related to modern and contemporary poetry. Abstracts of 300 words for papers of no more than twenty minutes should be submitted by 4 March, 2013 to shiftingterritoriesconference@gmail.com.
Organisers: Anna Hewitt, ahewitt@brookes.ac.uk; Niall Munro, n.munro@brookes.ac.uk; Nissa Parmar, 11111922@brookes.ac.uk

Categories
CFPs Events Postgraduate

Modernist Intimacies: CFP extended 11 February 2013

EXTENDED DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 11TH, 2013.

Call for Papers:

Modernist Intimacies

Friday May 17, 2013.

The Centre for Modernist Studies
University of Sussex

Featured Speaker: Denis Flannery (University of Leeds)

Responding to recent scholarly constellations of modernism, affect and intimacy this one-day symposium, hosted by the Centre for Modernist Studies at University of Sussex, seeks to explore new ways of thinking about modernist feeling and modernist intimacies. Are there such things as “modernist feelings”? How might different modernist narratives of emotion in psychoanalysis, literary theory, philosophy and medicine be made to collide, disrupt and form new points of contact? How do modernist bodies come together and apart?

We encourage papers from academics at all stages in their career and hope to encourage inter-generational discussions.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

-Genealogies of modernist affect
-Narratives of (im)personality
-Modernist diaries, autobiographies and letters
– Scenes of intimacy and extimacy in modernist writing
-The role of affect in modernist cinema and/or other visual arts
-Touch, texture, and textuality
-Modernist emotional geographies
-Modernism and affective disorders
-Modernist archives of feeling
– Constructions of publicity and privacy in modernist writing

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words (for 15-20 minute papers) and a short biography to Ruth Charnock at: rnec20@sussex.ac.uk by 11th February, 2013.

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CFPs Events Uncategorized

The Condemned Playground: Aldous Huxley and his Contemporaries, Balliol College, Oxford University 1-4 September 2013 CFP 10 Jan

The Condemned Playground:

Aldous Huxley and his Contemporaries

Balliol College, Oxford University

1-4* September 2013

Scheduled to coincide with the centenary of Aldous Huxley’s arrival at Balliol College as an undergraduate, this major international conference seeks both to reassess his diverse oeuvre, and to bring new attention to a constellation of writers whose work developed in dialogue with literary modernism. The conference, which incorporates the Fifth International Aldous Huxley Symposium, will look broadly at Huxley’s engagements with fellow British and American writers and with some of the key movements of his time.

More specifically, contributors to the conference may wish to (re)consider relationships between such novelists, poets and thinkers as Aldous Huxley, Evelyn Waugh, Anthony Powell, T.S. Eliot, William Gerhardie, Graham Greene, W.H. Auden, F. Scott Fitzgerald, W.B. Yeats, George Orwell, Henry Green, Angus Wilson, Iris Murdoch, Barbara Pym, Ottoline Morrell and J.G. Ballard.

We also invite reappraisals of the role of Oxford in the age of Huxley and papers that examine the ways in which his contemporaries responded to the great historical shifts and crises that marked his writing life (1916-1963).

We are hoping, above all, for papers on Huxley and his contemporaries that take off in new directions. Papers which follow the work of these writers beyond the Second World War, across media and continents, or even just across Oxfordshire, are particularly welcome.

Please send your proposed titles for a 15 minute paper, together with a 250 word abstract, to huxleyconference@gmail.com by 10th January 2013.

*Note new dates!

Categories
Events

Queer London Conference

Queer London Conference
Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies
University of Westminster
Saturday 23rd March 2013

Keynote Speaker:
Dr. Matt Cook (Birkbeck College, University of London)

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

This one-day conference is dedicated to a consideration of London and its role in creating, housing, reflecting and facilitating queer life. It will bring together scholars from a variety of different disciplines and backgrounds to consider representations of queer London and how London itself represents queers.

That London is a focus and centre for queer life and culture can be seen on its stages; in its bar and club scenes; in its film festivals and its representations in film; in its performance art; in its political life; in its gyms; in its history; in its book groups and book shops; and in its representations in the contemporary queer fiction of writers like Alan Hollinghurst and Sarah Waters. That London is a hub and an axis goes without saying. What the ‘Queer London’ conference offers is an opportunity for further analysis and investigation of these representations/representational platforms and consideration of the socio-cultural role that London plays in queer life.

The conference focuses on the period 1885 to the present and includes papers on topics such as diverse as 1920s lesbian London; modes of queer activism; the art and photography of Francis Bacon; London’s drag scenes; Alan Hollingshurst’s queer London; queer Soho; and London’s queer sex work.

The conference programme will shortly be posted here – http://queerlondonconf.wordpress.com/

The conference will be from 10.30am until 7pm and will be held in the University of Westminster’s building at 309 Regent Street.

The conference will be FREE to attend but places are limited. In order to reserve a place, please email queerlondonconf@gmail.com, including your name, contact details and affiliation.

If you have any question please get in touch with Dr. Simon Avery (s.avery@westminster.ac.uk) and Dr. Katherine M. Graham (k.graham1@westminster.ac.uk).

All best, Kate

Dr. Katherine M. Graham
Visiting Lecturer
Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies
University of Westminster
32-38 Well’s Street
LONDON W1T 3UW
Email: K.Graham1@westminster.ac.uk

Categories
Events

MSA 15, “Everydayness & the Event” CALL FOR PAPERS:

University of Sussex & Queen Mary, University of London
msabrighton@gmail.com

CALL FOR PAPERS:
MSA 15, “Everydayness & the Event”

http://msa.press.jhu.edu/conferences/index.html
________________________________________________________________
August 29-September 1, 2013
Brighton, UK
The organizers invite proposals for panels, round tables and seminars for inclusion in the fifteenth annual meeting of the Modernist Studies Association, to be held at the University of Sussex, Brighton, UK, August 29-September 1, 2013. We welcome proposals on any topics related to modernist studies broadly conceived, and would like to particularly encourage interdisciplinary proposals and participants from outside the UK. We are keen to receive proposals relating to the conference theme, especially for round tables and seminars, but the criteria for selection will be the overall quality of the proposal rather than relevance to the theme.
Conference overview
Modernism radically breaks from the ordinary and the received, staking its claims on making it new. But how might modernism also engage with the ordinary, the quotidian, the mundane or the banal? What kinds of events are precipitated by this conjunction? “Everydayness and the Event” encourages the exploration of philosophical subjects such as time, space and subjectivity; political questions about private versus public; psychoanalytic issues such as emotion and habit; and aesthetic questions of ordinariness (diary-writing, reportage, lists) and novelty (performance, intervention, the newsworthy).Topics of growing significance in modernist studies, the everyday and the event might be considered together or separately to include, for example, domesticity, objects, food, fashion, waste, public engagement, responses to events of local, national and international significance, the traumatic event and modernism as itself a happening.

The University of Sussex is home to the Mass Observation archive (www.massobs.org.uk/index.htm), a record of the behaviours and habits of everyday British people from 1937 to the present, while London and the area around Sussex were the sites of iconic modernist happenings such as the performance of Futurist music at the London Coliseum in 1914, the Dreadnought Hoax perpetrated by members of the Bloomsbury Group in 1910, and the ongoing “event” of the personal and artistic entanglements at Charleston, the Sussex home of the Bloomsbury set. During the conference, delegates will have the opportunity to join organized tours to Charleston and Monk’s House, the countryside home of the Woolfs, as well as Farley Farm House, home of the photographer Lee Miller and a centre of British surrealism. Delegates will also be able to attend a poetry “event” organized in collaboration with the Archive of the Now (www.archiveofthenow.org/). We hope the conference location will encourage reflection on the theme of “Everydayness and the Event” as well as self-reflection on the part of the participants on public readings and conferences such as the MSA as the spaces in which modernism happens.

The conference will include a keynote panel featuring Gillian Beer (Cambridge), Rachel Bowlby (UCL) Ben Highmore (Sussex), Esther Leslie (Birkbeck) Gabriel Josipovici (Sussex) and Michael Sheringham (Oxford). Further information about the keynote speakers will be announced soon.
The MSA welcomes proposals for seminars, panels, roundtables, and exhibitions, as described below.
MSA Statement on Conference Access The MSA is committed to ensuring that all conference registrants will be able to participate in conference events. We ask that all conference attendees give thought to questions of access and work with the conference organizers to create an event that is welcoming to the entire community of participants. If you would benefit from individual accommodations including, but not limited to, ASL translation, paper copies of session presentations, or large type documents, please contact the Program Committee Chair, Victoria Rosner, at vpr4@columbia.edu or (212)854-2720. We ask that all requests be made as soon as possible, and no later than July 1st, to ensure adequate lead time for arrangements to be made. Thank you for working with us to create an atmosphere that is inclusive and open for all registrants.
PROPOSAL DEADLINES:
Seminar Proposals, February 15, 2013
Panel Proposals, March 15, 2013
Round Table Proposals, March 15, 2013
Exhibition Proposals, March 15, 2013
CALL FOR SEMINAR PROPOSALS
Deadline: February 15, 2013
Seminars are among the most significant features of the MSA conference. Participants write brief “position papers” (5-7 pages) that are circulated and read prior to the conference. Because their size is limited to 15 participants, seminars generate lively exchange and often facilitate future collaborations. The format also allows a larger number of conference attendees to seek financial support from their institutions as they educate themselves and their colleagues on subjects of mutual interest. Seminars are two hours in length. Because seminars led solely by graduate students are not likely to be accepted, we encourage interested graduate students to invite a faculty member to lead the seminar with them.
Please note that this is the call for seminar leaders. Sign-up for seminar participants will take place on a first-come, first-served basis coinciding with registration for the conferenceSeminar Topics: There are no limits on topics, but past experience has shown that the more clearly defined the topic and the more guidance provided by the leader, the more productive the discussion. “Clearly defined” should not be confused with “narrow,” as extremely narrow seminar topics tend to exclude many potential applicants. To scan past seminar topics, go to the Conference Archives http://msa.press.jhu.edu/conference.html on the MSA website, click the link to a prior conference, and then click on “Conference Schedule” or “Conference Program.” You’ll find seminars listed along with panels and other events. Topics related to the conference theme are especially welcome and might include, for example, modernism and food, modernism and aging, or modernism and boredom. Seminar leaders might also consider proposing a topic based around Mass Observation or any of the specific events of modernism.
Proposing a Seminar: Seminar proposals must be submitted via email and must include the following information. Please assist us by sending this information in exactly the order given here:
* Use as a subject line: SEMINAR PROPOSAL / [LAST NAME OF SEMINAR LEADER] (e.g., SEMINAR PROPOSAL / GORMAN) * List the seminar leader’s name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address * Provide a brief curriculum vitae (including teaching experience) for the seminar leader * Give a brief description (up to 100 words) of the proposed topic
Note on AV provision: All rooms will contain a web-linked computer, a screen and a data projector. Participants are encouraged to bring presentations on memory sticks to avoid compatibility problems.
Submit proposals by February 15, 2013 to: msabrighton@gmail.com

CALL FOR PANEL PROPOSALS
Deadline: March 15, 2013
Successful proposals will introduce topics that promise to expand research and debate on a topic, and will present a clear rationale for the papers’ collective goal. Panel proposals which engage with a recent contentious or exciting new book or with a theoretical intervention into the field are encouraged. Topics are not limited to the theme “Everydayness and the Event.” Please bear in mind these guidelines:
* We encourage interdisciplinary panels and discourage panels on single authors. * In order to encourage discussion, preference will be given to panels with three participants, though panels of four will be considered. * Panels composed entirely of participants from a single department at a single institution are not likely to be accepted. * Graduate students are welcome as panelists. However, panels composed entirely of graduate students are less likely to be accepted than panels that include postdoctoral presenters together with graduate students.University of Sussex & Queen Mary, University of London
msabrighton@gmail.com

Proposals for panels must be submitted via email and must include the following information. Please assist us by sending this information in exactly the order given here:
* Use as a subject line: PANEL PROPOSAL / [LAST NAME OF PANEL ORGANIZER] (e.g., PANEL PROPOSAL / GORMAN) * Session title * Session organizer’s name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address * Chair’s name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, and contact information (if you do not identify a chair, we will locate one for you) * Panelists’ names, paper titles, institutional affiliations, disciplines, positions or titles, and contact information * A maximum 500-word abstract of the panel as a whole * Brief (2-3 sentence) scholarly biography of each panelist
Note on AV provision: All rooms will contain a web-linked computer, a screen and a data projector. Participants are asked to bring presentations on memory sticks to avoid compatibility problems.
Submit proposals by March 15, 2013 to: msabrighton@gmail.com

CALL FOR ROUNDTABLE PROPOSALS
Deadline: March 15, 2013
All topics will be considered for round tables, but we are especially keen to encourage proposals which develop the theme of the conference. Unlike panels, which generally feature a sequence of 15-20 minute talks followed by discussion, round tables gather a group of participants around a shared concern in order to generate discussion among the roundtable participants and with the audience. To this end, instead of delivering full-length papers, participants are asked to deliver short position statements in response to questions distributed in advance by the organizer, or to take turns responding to prompts from the moderator. The bulk of the session should be devoted to discussion. No paper titles are listed in the program, only the names of participants. Please bear in mind these guidelines:
* Roundtables may feature as many as 6 speakers. * We particularly welcome roundtables featuring participants from multiple disciplines, and we discourage roundtables on single authors. * Panels composed entirely of participants from a single department at a single institution are not likely to be accepted. * Graduate students are welcome as speakers. However, roundtables composed entirely of graduate students are less likely to be accepted than roundtables that include postdoctoral presenters together with graduate students.
Proposals for round tables must be submitted via email and must include the following information. Please assist us by sending this information in exactly the order given here:
* Use as a subject line: ROUNDTABLE PROPOSAL / [LAST NAME OF ROUNDTABLE ORGANIZER] (e.g., ROUNDTABLE PROPOSAL / GORMAN)University of Sussex & Queen Mary, University of London
msabrighton@gmail.com

* Session title * Session organizer’s name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address * Moderator’s name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, and contact information (if you do not identify a moderator, we will locate one for you) * Speakers’ names, institutional affiliations, disciplines, positions or titles, mailing addresses, phones, faxes, and e-mail addresses * A maximum 500-word rationale for the roundtable * Brief (2-3 sentence) scholarly biography of each speaker
Note on AV provision: All rooms will contain a web-linked computer, a screen and a data projector. Participants are asked to bring presentations on memory sticks to avoid compatibility problems.
Submit proposals by March 15, 2013 to: msabrighton@gmail.com

CALL FOR EXHIBITION PROPOSALS
Deadline: March 15, 2013
The MSA recognizes that some varieties of endeavour in modernist studies do not lend themselves to exposition in seminars, panels, or round tables. If you have work you would like to share at the conference that would be better conveyed through a poster, demonstration, or some other format, please contact the Program Committee Chair, Victoria Rosner, at vpr4@columbia.edu as soon as possible and no later than March 15, 2013.

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CFPs Events Postgraduate

CFP *deadline Dec 7* The British Society for Literature and Science Conference 2013

British Society for Literature and Science Conference 2013 – Call for Papers

**deadline Friday 7 December 2012**

 

Cardiff University and the University of Glamorgan

The British Society for Literature and Science invites proposals for papers and panels to be delivered at its eighth annual conference to be held in Cardiff, 11-13 April 2013.

The BSLS Conference does not have a theme (as it its usual practise) but especially welcomes proposals on the state of the field of literature and science as well as its relation to other fields. This year we would be particularly interested to receive proposals that reflect upon the interdisciplinary study of literature and science in the context of the debate about the present position of the humanities in academia. However, the Society remains committed to supporting proposals on all aspects of literature and science across all periods.

Proposals for papers of 15-20 minutes should be sent in the body of the email text (no attachments, please), to bsls2013@yahoo.co.uk with the subject line ‘BSLS 2013 abstract’. Submissions should include the title of the paper, an abstract of no more than 300 words, a maximum of 3 keywords (placed at the end of the abstract), and the name and contact details of the speaker.

Closing date for submissions: 7 December 2012.

(Decisions will be made in January 2013)

Contributors interested in organising a panel or other special session, or who have suggestions for alternative forms of conference presentation, are warmly encouraged to contact the conference organisers. The organisers would welcome, for example, workshops on teaching literature and science, or on specific themes in literature and science that cross period boundaries, or on specific published works with considerable influence in the field. Please email the organisers on bsls2013@yahoo.co.uk, using ‘BSLS 2013 Panel’ as the subject line in email correspondence.

 

Funding: a bursary of £150 will be awarded to a graduate student on the basis on the paper proposals. The student must be registered for a masters or doctoral degree on 9 January 2013. The conference fee will be waived for two further graduate students in exchange for written reports on the conference, to be published in the subsequent issue of the BSLS Newsletter. If you are interested in being selected for one of these places, please mention this when sending in your proposal.

 

Accommodation: please note that those attending will need to make their own arrangements for accommodation. Information on selected hotels will be available shortly on the conference website.As in previous years, we anticipate that the conference will begin at about 1pm on the first day and conclude at about 2pm on the last.

 

Membership: in order to attend the conference, you must be a paid-up member of the BSLS for 2013. We anticipate that it will be possible to pay the £10 annual membership fee when paying the conference fee online.

 

FURTHER INFORMATION

Visit the conference website at: http://literatureandscience.research.glam.ac.uk/bsls2013/

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CFPs Events Postgraduate

CFP: Modernist Intimacies, 17 May 2013, University of Sussex

Call for Papers:

 

Modernist Intimacies

 

Friday May 17, 2013.

 

Centre for Modernist Studies

University of Sussex

 

Responding to recent scholarly constellations of modernism, affect and intimacy this one-day symposium, hosted by the Centre for Modernist Studies at University of Sussex, seeks to explore new ways of thinking about modernist feeling and modernist intimacies. Are there such things as “modernist feelings”? How might different modernist narratives of emotion in psychoanalysis, literary theory, philosophy and medicine be made to collide, disrupt and form new points of contact? How do modernist bodies come together and apart?

 

We encourage papers from academics at all stages in their career and hope to encourage inter-generational discussions.

 

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

 

-Genealogies of modernist affect

-Narratives of (im)personality

-Modernist diaries, autobiographies and letters

– Scenes of intimacy and extimacy in modernist writing

-The role of affect in modernist cinema and/or other visual arts

-Touch, texture, and textuality

-Modernist emotional geographies

-Modernism and affective disorders

-Modernist archives of feeling

– Constructions of publicity and privacy in modernist writing

 

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words (for 15-20 minute papers) and a short biography to Ruth Charnock at:  rnec20@sussex.ac.uk by 15th January, 2013.