Categories
Events

Making of Modernity Seminar Series, University of Birmingham

Forthcoming seminars in the  Making of Modernity seminar series at the University of Birmingham.

1.  Nadia Valman, ‘A Ghetto of Voluntary Formation: Israel Zangwill’s Whitechapel’, and Dominic Williams, ‘The Split Man and the Crowd Master: John Rodker and Wyndham Lewis’, 6 December 2012, 5pm, Barber Institute.

2.  Peter Franklin, ‘Terminal prestige…and the dangers of writing German opera in 1932′, 15 January 2013, 5pm, Barber Institute.

Click here for the poster for the first event Poster

Jim Mussell

Department of English

University of Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham

B15 2TT
United Kingdom

+44 (0)121 414 5657

Categories
CFPs Events

CFP 1 Dec: ‘”Efface the Traces!” Modernism and Influence’

The deadline for submission of abstracts for this conference has been extended to 1 January 2013.

Please see below for the call for papers.

Conference: ‘”Efface the Traces!” Modernism and Influence’

Durham University, 9-11 April 2013

Keynote Speakers:

Dr Matthew Bevis (University of Oxford)

Dr Marina MacKay (Durham University)

Dr Ankhi Mukherjee (University of Oxford)

‘[T]he poets of the nineties were entirely missed out of my personal history […] I never read any of these people until it was much too late for me to get anything out of them’. T.S. Eliot, letter to Ezra Pound, 1924 ‘[I]t was towards the end of my school days or in my first year or two at Harvard University [that] I was reading the poets of the ‘nineties, who were the only poets […] who at that period of history seemed to have anything to offer me as a beginner’.

T.S. Eliot, Saltire Review, iv, 1957

If Ezra Pound’s clamorous injunction – ‘make it new!’ – might be considered the first commandment of modernism, then Brecht’s dictum – ‘efface the traces!’ – stands as its complementary shadow statement. As the example of Eliot begins to illustrate, the Poundian urge to transfigure ‘legitimate’ influences results in a comparable urge to efface influences considered inappropriate. However, criticism has often proved inadequately alert to the motives underlying authorial advertisement and evasion of influence, instead colluding with the artist in the construction of a suspiciously orderly canonical narrative of modernist influence. We dutifully discuss Eliot as the heir of Dante and Donne; we corroborate Woolf’s departure from Wells and Bennett; we identify the Ibsen in Exiles, and the Confucianism of the Cantos. This conference is conceived in the belief that the intersection between advertised and effaced influence operates as a particularly illuminating point of departure from which to develop new critical perspectives on the narrative(s) of modernism. This approach is also efficacious in projecting enquiry beyond the conventional spatial and temporal locus of modernism (London/Paris, 1890-1930), by drawing attention to hidden nineteenth-century proto-modernisms, and the contemporaneous cross-cultural interaction of rivalling counter-modernisms. Similarly, it encourages a nuanced handling of the vicissitudes of the mid-to-late twentieth-century reception of modernism – from Larkin’s early jettisoning of Yeats to Winterson’s strident advocacy of Woolf – by drawing attention both to the cultural investments of the modernist authors themselves, and to those of subsequent writers striving to stake out a distinct position beyond modernism’s daunting shadow.

We invite 20 minute papers and panel proposals on any of the following variations upon this theme, although respondents should not consider themselves restricted to these topics. Interdisciplinary research is also very much welcomed.

Negotiating anxieties of influence

Modernist self-fashioning

The response of present-day writers to modernism

Influence across disciplines

Effacement strategies

The figuring of modernism as either a positive or negative aesthetic precursor

Influence as a factor in constructing aesthetic communities

The marketing of influence

Originality in an age of mechanical reproduction

The traffic of influence between medical discourses and modernist texts

Feminist celebration of influence

Other modernism(s): influence across cultural borders

Authorial progression and amendment of influence

The mediation of influence through parody and allusion

Defining disciplines: influence within academic theory after modernism

The politics of literary parentage

Friendship networks, publicity conspiracies, and group-think

Nineteenth-century post-Romantic culture and modernism

Abstracts of no more than 250 words are invited by 1st January 2013. Please email submissions to effacethetraces@gmail.com. You can also use this address to contact us with any other questions, such as how to arrange attendance as a non-speaking delegate. Additionally, you can visit our website at effacethetraces.wordpress.com. The conference will take place in St. Chad’s College, Durham. Panels will follow the format of three 20-minute papers followed by questions, and each day will feature a plenary speaker.

The registration fee is £30 for salaried academics and £15 for postgraduates and postdoctoral researchers. We will be offering three postgraduate bursaries to particularly outstanding applicants, to cover the registration fee, accommodation, and a portion of travel costs. If you are the recipient of a bursary, we will inform you when accepting your paper.

Categories
Events

Alternative Modernisms: * CFP deadline extended until 31 December 2012 *

Alternative Modernisms: An International, Interdisciplinary Conference
Cardiff University 16-18 May 2013

* CFP deadline extended until 31 December 2012 *

Following a number of requests for more time to submit proposals, the committee have decided to extend the Alternative Modernisms CFP deadline until 31 December 2012. The CFP remains the same, although we would particularly welcome more proposals on the visual arts, music and material culture.

Please find attached the updated CFP in English and Welsh. For more information, visit http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/encap/modernisms/, or email queries and/or submissions to modernisms@cardiff.ac.uk.

Many thanks to all those who have already submitted proposals, we’ve been overwhelmed by the response. We will endeavour to be in touch as soon as possible.

Kind regards,

Emma West

Principal conference organiser
Alternative Modernisms
Cardiff University

Categories
CFPs Events Postgraduate

Religion, Philosophy and Myth in T.S. Eliot’s Poetry Colloquium CFP deadline March 2013

 

Religion, Philosophy and Myth in T.S. Eliot’s Poetry

 

Call for Papers

 

Plenary Speaker: Professor Valentine Cunningham

(Author of British Writers of the Thirties Reading After Theory)

Seminar Leader: Dr Jane Dowson

(Author of Women, Modernism and British Poetry, 1910-1939: Resisting Femininity)

 

Colloquium at University of Leicester, 6th September 2013

 

This colloquium responds to the burgeoning critical interest in the religious and spiritual themes within literary modernismAs Barry Spurr argues in Anglo-Catholic in Religion: T.S. Eliot and Christianity (2010), there is yet much scope for reconsidering Eliot’s poetry vis-à-vis his religious position. Eliot’s modernist poetics are inseparable from his spiritual sensibility, and his Anglo-Catholic belief was shaped by other discursiveinfluences such as anthropology and philosophy. Furthermore, Eliot’s spiritual development was not a logicalmatter and his devotional poetry is rarely didactic or transparent. This colloquium seeks to pay particular attention to the religious nuances of Eliot’s poetic development.

 

As a colloquium, the day will consist of discussion of papers which are submitted in full and circulated to all participants in advance. We welcome papers that consider the religious/spiritual implications of T.S. Eliot’s poetry. Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to, the following:

 

Anglo-Catholic belief

Prufrock, a meaningless life and the quest for spiritual fulfilment

Traditions of religious poetry

Mythography/New Criticism and restoring the waste land

The use of biblical metaphor

Ariel Poems and revelation

Modernist poetics and expressions of faith in a post-religious context

Ash-Wednesday, faith and lack of faith

Biblical prophets of doom or salvation

Four Quartets and the movement of time

 

Please send proposals of 250-300 words to Dr Scott Freer sef17@le.ac.uk (author of Modernist Mythopoeia:The Twilight of the GodsPalgrave 2013), by 31st March 2013. Delegates must submit completed papers(approx. 4,000 words) by 20th July 2013. Publishers will be approached with a proposal for a collection of essays based on the colloquium.

Categories
CFPs Events

‘Efface the Traces!’ – Modernism and Influence Durham University, 9-11 April 2013 CFP

‘Efface the Traces!’ – Modernism and Influence

Durham University, 9-11 April 2013

 

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS EXTENDED TO 1 JANUARY 2013

 

‘[T]he poets of the nineties were entirely missed out of my personal history […] I never read any of these people until it was much too late for me to get anything out of them’.

T.S. Eliot, letter to Ezra Pound, 1924

‘[I]t was towards the end of my school days or in my first year or two at Harvard University [that] I was reading the poets of the ‘nineties, who were the only poets […] who at that period of history seemed to have anything to offer me as a beginner’.

T.S. Eliot, Saltire Review, iv, 1957

 

If Ezra Pound’s clamorous injunction – ‘make it new!’ – might be considered the first commandment of modernism, then Brecht’s dictum – ‘efface the traces!’ – stands as its complementary shadow statement. As the example of Eliot begins to illustrate, the Poundian urge to transfigure ‘legitimate’ influences results in a comparable urge to efface influences considered inappropriate. However, criticism has often proved inadequately alert to the motives underlying authorial advertisement and evasion of influence, instead colluding with the artist in the construction of a suspiciously orderly canonical narrative of modernist influence. We dutifully discuss Eliot as the heir of Dante and Donne; we corroborate Woolf’s departure from Wells and Bennett; we identify the Ibsen in Exiles, and the Confucianism of the Cantos.

This conference is conceived in the belief that the intersection between advertised and effaced influence operates as a particularly illuminating point of departure from which to develop new critical perspectives on the narrative(s) of modernism. This approach is also efficacious in projecting enquiry beyond the conventional spatial and temporal locus of modernism (London/Paris, 1890-1930), by drawing attention to hidden nineteenth-century proto-modernisms, and the contemporaneous cross-cultural interaction of rivalling counter-modernisms. Similarly, it encourages a nuanced handling of the vicissitudes of the mid-to-late twentieth-century reception of modernism – from Larkin’s early jettisoning of Yeats to Winterson’s strident advocacy of Woolf – by drawing attention both to the cultural investments of the modernist authors themselves, and to those of subsequent writers striving to stake out a distinct position beyond modernism’s daunting shadow.

We invite 20 minute papers on any of the following variations upon this theme, although respondents should not consider themselves restricted to these topics. Interdisciplinary research is also very much welcomed.

  • Negotiating anxieties of influence
  • Modernist self-fashioning
  • The response of present-day writers to modernism
  • Influence across disciplines
  • Effacement strategies
  • The figuring of modernism as either a positive or negative aesthetic precursor
  • Influence as a factor in constructing aesthetic communities
  • The marketing of influence
  • Originality in an age of mechanical reproduction
  • The traffic of influence between medical discourses and modernist texts
  • Feminist celebration of influence
  • Other modernism(s): influence across cultural borders
  • Authorial progression and amendment of influence
  • The mediation of influence through parody and allusion
  • Defining disciplines: influence within academic theory after modernism
  • The politics of literary parentage
  • Friendship networks, publicity conspiracies, and group-think
  • Nineteenth-century post-Romantic culture and modernism

Abstracts of no more than 250 words are invited by 1st January 2013. Please email submissions to effacethetraces@gmail.com. You can also use this address to contact us with any additional questions, such as how to arrange attendance as a non-speaking delegate. Additionally, you can visit our website at effacethetraces.wordpress.com.

The conference will take place in St. Chad’s College, Durham. Panels will follow the format of three 20-minute papers followed by questions, and each day will feature a plenary speaker. Our plenary speakers will be Dr Matthew Bevis (University of Oxford), Dr Marina MacKay (Durham University), and Professor Pat Waugh (Durham University). The registration fee is £30 for salaried academics and £15 for postgraduates and postdoctoral researchers. We will be offering three postgraduate bursaries to particularly outstanding applicants, to cover the registration fee, accommodation, and a portion of travel costs. If you are the recipient of a bursary, we will inform you when accepting your paper.

Categories
Events

Approaching War: Childhood, Culture and the First World War, 1880-1919

Keynote Speaker: Trudi Tate (University of Cambridge)

An International Leverhulme Trust Project
http://research.ncl.ac.uk/fww-child/

Third International Conference

Approaching War: Europe
Newcastle University, UK, 15-17 March, 2013

This is the third of three conferences aimed at producing a website and edited collections to provide teachers, academics, and the interested public with a rich and diverse resource of materials on childhood, children’s culture and children’s literature in the period 1890-1919.  The searchable website will consist of video recordings of the conference papers, backed up by summaries, images, links and bibliographies; the published volumes will contain expanded versions of the conference papers.

We are inviting proposals for papers on any aspect of childhood, children’s culture and children’s literature in this period, relating to the approach of war. Potential topics might include

·      Toys, Games and Ephemera
·      Children’s Literature before 1914 (especially poetry)
·      Children’s Poetry of the War
·      The Approach to War in Continental Europe
·      Materials Written by Children
·      The Treatment of Children and War in 20th and 21st Century Children’s Books

Proposals should be in the form of a detailed summary (no more than 500 words), including an indication of the (non-copyright) visual materials that you could provide for the website. In order to obtain maximum benefit from the conference, participants would be asked to produce, by 1 February 2013, an advanced draft paper, which would then be put on the website with access limited to other conference delegates. At the conference, speakers will be asked to give a 20-30 minute presentation, which will be digitally recorded for the website. After the conference, we will ask for completed papers to be sent to us by 30 April, 2013. The papers will then be peer-reviewed for inclusion in the published volumes or on the website.