INFORMATION OVERLOAD – Call for Papers / Workshop Leaders

INFORMATION OVERLOAD – Call for Papers / Workshop Leaders
Conference Date: 4th-5th September 2014, University of Edinburgh
Deadline for Proposals: Friday 16 June 2014
www.infoload.co.uk | @infoload2014 | cfp@infoload.co.uk

In recent years, information overload has become a popular term to describe the psychological, emotional and physical consequences of living in a culture defined by the increasing density of data and reach of communication technologies. We invite contributors for a two-day conference to explore the reverberations of this bloom of data in cultural, artistic and academic practice. Aiming to trace an aesthetics of information overload, this event seeks to analyse how different environments and their consequent effects, both real and projected, public and personal, have engendered artistic forms. We encourage participants to experiment with a range of presentational formats, testing new ways of sharing information as well as discussing its conceptual ramifications. The conference aims to prompt conversations between new and perhaps unexpected perspectives on contemporary art, literature, media and culture, opening discussion to a wide range of disciplines, approaches and theoretical frameworks. How have authors and artists interrogated information overload, diagnosed its symptoms and hypothesised its cure? Are there benefits to conceptual overload? What aesthetic forms have been developed to represent or counteract the effects of overload?

Please see the CfP at infoload.co.uk/cfp for full details.

CONTACT: cfp@infoload.co.uk
ORGANISERS: Dorothy Butchard, Andrew Campbell, Rob Lederer

INFORMATION OVERLOAD is a project to trace the aesthetics of information overload in cultural, artistic & academic practice. The conference in Edinburgh on 4th-5th September 2014 is funded by AHRC Collaborative Skills award and Edinburgh University’s Researcher-Led Initiative fund.

Follow us @infoload2014 or check infoload.co.uk for conference updates, writing on the theme of information overload, and more details.